Miss Pelican's Perch

Looking at my World from a Different Place


Leave a comment

Mistress Moon

When I went on my walk this morning, I looked up and beheld Luna’s baleful eye gazing down on me. It was ominous. It was creepy. It was oh-so-cool.

If you do a google search for “moon”, you will get back 347 million results. The results range for this morning’s rare occurrence, to songs and stories about her, to her effects on tides, to her as a theme for a popular video gaming system.

She is everywhere in our cultures.

Luna is part of our past through our legends and mythologies.

She is with us in our present. Scientists will tell us that the moon has absolutely no effect on human behavior or psychology , yet many of us believe it does.   Furthermore, she is a part of inner-most selves.  Some in the psychological field see the moon as a symbol of the unconscious, the feminine principle in our psyches, and even representative of our “shadow” selves.

The moon, according to some, is even a part of our future. She is a part of prophecy.

It would seem that Mistress Moon serves as a conveyor of all that is human.

 

Text and image: ljgloyd (c) 2018

 


Leave a comment

Regarding Hope

Pandora letting Hope fly free.

The WordPress Daily Post wants to know what we think about the idea of “hopefulness”.   I guess they put this prompt up because it is the last day of a truly awful, horrible year.

But here is the thing to consider:  Calendars and yearly numeric designations are artificial constructs and should not have any influence on the application of hope in our lives.  I will have no more or no less hope tomorrow as I do today or as I did in 1982.   Our understanding of time should have no bearing at all on hope.  Hope is timeless and eternal.

Furthermore, the application of hope has everything to do with circumstances.   For example:

Am I hopeful that our vicious, strident political climate will improve in 2017?   No.

Am I hopeful that our world will become a less violent place next year?  No.  In fact, it may become worse.

Am I hopeful that the Lakers will rise up from being designated the worst basketball franchise ever?  Absolutely no — that would take a true miracle.

However, there are some things wherein I do have hope:

Will I become a better, stronger, kinder, more functional person?   There is a glimmer of hope there.

Will my friends and family enjoy health and prosperity next year?  I always hope for that.

Is there a Power greater than us moving through our lives in this dark and bitter world to make them better?    Of that I have absolute hope.

Based on this last point, I wish you:

A Happy New Year and May You All Be Blessed

ljgloyd (c) 2016

Image:  Pandora releasing Hope into the world.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/hopeful/


2 Comments

In the Boardroom

image

What if the goddesses from Greek mythology ran a corporation….

 

A tall, athletic woman in a green running suit and trainers entered the boardroom.

“Artie, you’re late!’ Another woman, clad in a pin-striped suit, consulted a large binder in front of her.

“’Thena, you can take your calendar book and put it where the sun don’t shine”. Artie plunked herself in a chair across the table from Thena and propped her feet on the edge.

Thena glared at her and said, “Is that how you dress for a meeting with the CEO?”

“Sorry, my shoulder pads are at the cleaners.”

“Ladies! That’s enough. She’ll be here any minute. Does anyone know why she called us together?” asked the woman seated next to Thena. She had a scowl on her face and nervously toyed with the gold band on her left hand. “I’ve got things to do.”

Artie responded, “What, Hera? Trailing your hubby again? Who’s he running around with today?”

“Shut up! At least I have a man. Shot anyone lately, Artie?”

Thena glared at them both. “Y’know, this is why the Company is suffering. Neither of you can focus on the greater good. Especially you, Artie. You’re always running off into some forest or something. Why can’t you just do your job?”

“Which is what, if I may ask? Hob-nobbing with the ‘old-boys’ club? At least I try—“ She stopped when Thena reached across the table and touched the arm of the plain, silent woman seated next to Artie.

“Hes, honey, maybe now is not a good time to be lighting incense?” Hes smiled at Thena and extinguished the tiny brazier on the table in front of her.

“That’s a good girl, sweetie. You know how that smoke gives me a headache.”

“Look at you,” continued Artie, “always bossing people around, telling people what to do, where to do, how to dress, what to say. Look at Seph and Demi over there. You won’t even let them get a word in edgewise.” Artie pointed to the woman and girl seated at the far end of the table. Demi sat with her arm around her daughter. They were deep in conversation and ignoring the rest.

“Oh, c’mon, Artie” exclaimed Hera, “we all know what the both of you did to poor Aphie.” Hera motioned her head to the woman seated next to Demi and Seph. Aphie was motionless, her vacant eyes staring into nothingness. “She hasn’t said a word in months because of what you did—“

“That was Artie’s doing, not mine,” said Thena, “in fact—“

At the moment the door swung open and hit the wall of the boardroom. The CEO entered, struggling with a pile of books she held in her arms. “Can someone give me a hand with this?”

Thena jumped up and took some the books from the CEO.

“Suck up..” hissed Artie under her breath.

Thena placed the books at the head of the table. On top was a volume of Russian fairy tales.

The CEO clutched another one to her entitled Female Archetypes: Their Functions and Purposes. Thena reseated herself.

The CEO stood at the head of the table and looked at each of them in turn. Finally, she said:

“Ladies, I called you together today, because, quite frankly, we have a problem.”

Thena jumped in, “Yes, I was just saying to the—“

The CEO motioned at her. “I’m doing the talking her this morning, if you please.” Thena fell silent with a look of surprise.

“Let me make this short and to the point: you all are driving me nuts.”

The women looked at one another and then back at the CEO.

“This constant bickering has got to stop.” She began to pace around the table. “I have enough things to deal with in the real world without listening to you guys arguing amongst yourself. You have got to learn to get along with each other.”

Thena spoke up, “I’m sorry, ma’am, but you see Artie—“

“Thena, I fully appreciate everything you do. You keep things moving along. I depend on your orderliness and conformity. I really do. You are the engine that drives things. But, you need to stop being so critical of the rest. They each have a function and you need to respect that.”

Artie snickered.

“And you, Artie,” the CEO circled behind her, “You, Artie, need to be a little more cooperative. I appreciate your free thinking independence. You keep Thena from getting too bogged down in rules and regulations, but you have got to stop sabotaging her at every turn. The Company would be a lot further along if you tried that.”

The CEO looked across the table at Hera. “And, you have got to lighten up. Your attitude, most of the time, well, how can I say this? Your attitude stinks and you really aren’t pleasant to be around.” Hera opened her mouth but nothing came out. “Hera, I need you to help me deal with some of the difficulties I have ‘out there’. You lend an air of dignity…of confidence…this I really need at times.” Hera straightened up in her seat and her scowl softened a bit.

The CEO put a hand on Hes’s shoulder. “And Hes…” she glared at the others. “….if Hes wants to light incense, then let her. She is my connection to the Source. I need her as much as I need any of you. Hear me on this: you will let her alone. Got it?”

Then she approached Demi and Seph. “You two…” Demi pulled Seph even closer. “…you two have got to be a bit more assertive. Demi, I know you have too little time to spend with your daughter while she is here on earth, but you need to spend some time nurturing me as well. I need some “mothering” once in a while myself.”

“Yes, ma’am,” muttered Demi.

The CEO then turned to everyone. “And all of you need to let Seph come out and play more often.” Seph blushed and buried her face in her mother’s shoulder. The CEO smiled at Seph and leaned down to her. “Honey, it’s okay to have a little fun while you are here. It keeps us all from becoming too serious.” Seph looked up and beamed at the CEO.

The CEO straightened up, her face suddenly grim, and walked to the last woman at the table: Aphie. “And can someone please explain this to me? What happened here?”

Thena and Artie shifted in their seats but said nothing. After a moment, Seph’s small voice spoke up. “They did it. They zapped her with a spell.”

Thena and Artie glared at the girl. Demi said, “Shush. You don’t want them to zap you too.”

The CEO lifted an eyebrow and looked at the two women at the head of the table. “Well?”

Thena cleared her voice and started, “You see- it was Artie who—“

“Hey, watch it sweetie—“

Hera piped in “They are both responsible, ma’am.”

“Shut up!”

The CEO raised a hand. “Please continue, Hera.”

“Well, see, as you know, Aphie tends to get a little passionate about her ideas. You know, she’s the ‘creative’ one? Anyway, Aphie suggested if Artie and Thena could just connect with their masculine counterparts, then maybe the ideas could flow a little more freely. She said… well, she said they needed to be a bit more ‘randy.’

“Hera!” both Artie and Thena shouted in unison.

“Well, it’s true!”

“And that’s when they zapped Aphie,” giggled Seph.

“Is this true?” asked the CEO.

“It’s not at all like that—“ said Artie.

“Is this true!?”

“Well, she was getting so loud about it all…”

“Release her. Now.”

“But—“

“NOW.”

Thena and Artie looked at each other and then, in unison, banged their right hands on the top of the table.

Life returned to Aphie’s eyes. She blinked and cleared her throat. “Where am I?” Demi gave her a motherly pat on the shoulder. “You’re back with us, dear. You’ll be just fine.”

The CEO returned to the head of the table. She said in a low voice to Artie and Thena, “I do not expect anything like this to happen again. Am I clear?”

Then, the fluorescent ceiling lights flickered and Thena rose to her feet. “Who do you think you are talking to?” she thundered at the CEO. “I work my fingers to the bone for you and this is the thanks I get?!”

The CEO stared her down. “I know who I am talking to and let me remind you: you all work for me. I do not work for you. You will do as I say or you can take a walk.”

A stunned silence fell over the table. “Now that that’s settled,” she continued, “I am thinking about bringing some new life into this group.” She patted the book of Russian fairy tales. “I’m thinking about hiring a consultant. Have you all heard of The Baba Yaga?”

Seph whispered to Demi, “Who’s that, Mama?”

“The Crone.” Demi chuckled. “She’d sure knocked some sense into this lot.”

“Um, ma’am..”

“Yes, Thena.”

“That’s really not necessary.”

“Let’s hope so.” The CEO picked up her books and headed out the boardroom door. “Let’s just hope so.”

No one said anything at first, except Aphie who was humming contently to herself. She pulled a compact out of her purse and began applying new lipstick.

Artie glared at Thena. “Now see what you’ve done?”

Ljgloyd © 2008, 2014
Image: “Archetypal Eggs”, manipulated photo. 2008


4 Comments

How to Make a Myth

This past weekend, I was visiting with a very elderly relative.

Our conversation started with gardening, which led a discussion of the weather, then on to the science of digging wells, then to how water flows underground, to dowsing, and then finally to concerns about our drought.  We talked about a nearby creek bed that is dry most of the year and serves only as a place where rain water from winter storms runs off to the sea.

Then my relative shared a story about the creek.  Decades ago, his grandfather-in-law told him a story that he had heard as a child from an elderly woman.  The elderly woman had related that when she was young, there was enough water in the creek to row a boat all the way from the sea to the city — about 10 miles.

My point in sharing this has nothing to do with creeks or boats or drought.  My point is that I was listening to an account of an event that happened about 200 years ago.  I don’t know about you, but I think it is amazing that this minor little event, a tiny strand of a memory, has threaded its way down six or seven generations.

Factual events happen and become stories told to the next generation.  As they get passed along through the years, they may become legends, until finally — if the events are great enough– become myths and flow into the river of our collective unconscious.

I don’t think this boat ride will become a myth, but then again, there is something of a Garden of Eden quality about the story:  “Once upon a time, in the days when water flowed freely and everything was green and lovely, a girl-child went on a boat ride……”

ljg (c) 2013.


2 Comments

Bedtime Stories

greek myths

I cannot say that I had one particular favorite book as a child. I can say that I read a lot — and a mean A LOT — when I was a child. My dad would take me to the library every few days and he would comment on the fact that I kept checking out some of the same books over and over. One book I kept checking out was D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire. It was (and still is) a beautifully and vibrantly illustrated book. I liked this book so much that when a re-issue came out a few years ago, I bought it.

I like reading mythology and archetypes of Greek gods and goddesses sometimes emerge in my stories, and to this day I keep fantasizing about illustrating my own children’s book of tales.

So I guess I can say that this book has had an influence on my creative endeavors.

Prompted by the Daily Post

ljg 2013